Expanding Green Infrastructure as a Response to Environmental Injustice and Climate Change

Funded by The United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture McIntire Stennis Capacity Grant

 

Project Summary

This project responds to an urgent and timely opportunity to transform vacant, neglected, and underutilized land into a matrix of green infrastructure (GI) for the residents and ecology of the Detroit area. The objective is to advance the science necessary to make informed decisions about how to maintain the existing forestry as well as expand urban forest ecosystems as part of a broader GI strategy. The project has three specific objectives: 1) quantify changes in Detroit’s GI over 25 years (1992-2018); 2) develop and deploy robust sustainability criteria to identify optimal sites for maintaining and expanding GI in Detroit; and 3) delineate future climate-resilient pathways reflecting different climatic realities and the multidimensionality of GI. GLISA contributed regional historical observations and model projections for southeast Michigan and presented the historical trends via a webinar. GLISA’s work will continue through Fall 2021 with the possible development of scenarios focusing on the climate impacts on GI. 

Project Accomplishments

  • Model future urbanization patterns for Southeast Michigan and assess future impacts on forests
  • Integrate future climate-resilient pathways reflecting different climatic realities
  • Deploy robust sustainability criteria to identify suitable and priority sites for maintaining and expanding green infrastructure in Southeast Michigan
  • GLISA presented historical temperature and precipitation trends for southeast Michigan on a webinar hosted by the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) on June 4, 2020

GLISA Contribution

GLISA was a funded partner working with faculty from the University of Michigan’s Taubman College and School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS). GLISA Co-PI Rood presented on a webinar hosted by the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) focusing on the historical temperature and precipitation trends for southeast Michigan. GLISA climatologist provided the data used in the presentation based on the information from the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI).

Project Partners

  • The University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS)
  • The University of Michigan Taubman College
  • Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG)

GLISA Contact

Dr. Richard Rood, GLISA Co-PI, rbrood@umich.edu

Omar Gates, Climatologist, gateso@umich.edu